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Question #1
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Audio Transcript

A couple years ago, an event planner called me because I was going to do a speaking event at one of their events. She called and said, “I’m really struggling with how to write about you on a promotion flyer. “And I thought, "Well, what's the struggle? “And she said, "Well, I have seen you speak, so I should be calling you a speaker, however and I'm going to call you a researcher, I think, but I'm afraid if I address you as a researcher, audiences will not turn up, because they'll think you're dull and unrelated. “And I was like, "Okay. “And she said, "But the thing I liked about your talk is you're a professional storyteller. So, I think what I'll do i just call you a storyteller. “And of course, the academic, insecure part of me was like, "You're going to call me a what? “And she said, "I'm going to call you a storyteller. “And I was like, "Why not 'magic maker'?"

Question #2
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Audio Transcript

When you have 25 minutes to give a speech, two million years seems like a really very long time. But surprisingly, two million years is nothing. And yet in two million years, the human brain has nearly folded in 3 folds in mass, going from the one-and-a-quarter pound brain of our forerunner here, Habilis, to the almost three-pound meat loaf that everybody here has between their ears. What is it about a huge brain that natural world was so eager for every one of us to have one? Well, it turns out when brains triple in size, they don't just get three times superior; they gain new structure. And one of the main reasons our brain got so big is because it got a new part, called the "frontal lobe." mainly, a part called the "pre-frontal cortex."